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A revolutionary theory about blisters

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Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS
………….
marinera you are mistaken about boiling at room temps with boiling at 212%F

Not the same. you do not feel the heat cause it isn’t there but the result of being burned is there..

Nope. The heat is more efficient because the differential of pressure is higher, so, in your hypothesis,the heat that is boiling the water at -5hg pressure (in the vacuum pump) is also enough heat to cook your penis.


Last edited by marinera : 11-29-2008 at . Reason: punctaction and myso

When I use to pump at high Vacuum pressures the signs of burning was there. I might not felt the heat but the signs was there. Same as getting a sunburn

You get red skin that last a couple days and/or browning of the skin and or blistering

Simple as that


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

However, you can do a very simple experiment: fill 2/3 or your vacuum pump with water; lower the pressure inside at 4 hg (or whatever pressure you think can cause blisters); see if at room-temp the water starts boiling.

It’s less time consuming than arguing here. Do it and let us know. For the sake of the science. :)

I have already said I have seen it done and that with my experiments salt water evaporated sooner than pure water..

I have already seen that and done that.

But I didn’t say 4hg. That was what he said. I said pumping high with the HG.

I pump at about 3 HG and do not have problems with that and do not think 4 HG would make too much difference.


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

So, at how much pressure should water start boiling at room-temp, in your hypothesis?

Edit: in your experience, since you say you have already done it. How much was the pressure? Just to see if anyone else gets your same results or you are living in a different universe, you know.

about -12 PSI that is about 24-25 HG


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

But your body is normally 98.6% F and people heat the penis before pumping. Which can change the temp needed


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

So you have boiling water at room temp and 25 hg vacuum?


Last edited by marinera : 11-29-2008 at .

Also, if you don’t mind, what vac-pump were you using?

Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS
He talks about ambient air pressure and not being able to go below it.

False. I said you can’t go below absolute vacuum. My post talked explicitly about going below ambient air pressure to create a relative (not an absolute) vacuum.

Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS
The lowest vacuum ever measured was 29.99 PSI..

Source? (Absent a source, I’m guessing that should be 29.99 inHg, not PSI.)

Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS
OK going by what he said you can not go beyond zero absolute pressure..

False let me explain..

The atmospheric pressure at see level is 14.7 PSI.. so going by what he said you would not be able to go beyond zero PSI but we know you can go to at least -29.99 PSI so if you take away 14.7 PSI there is 15.29 PSI that would be below what he claims you can not go beyond..

I believe you are mixing non-interchangeable units again. Atmospheric pressure of 14.7 PSI is 29.92 inHg. You could reduce an atmospheric pressure of 14.7 PSI by nearly 14.7 PSI. You could reduce an atmospheric pressure of 29.92 inHg by nearly 29.92 inHg. Without a source, I have no reason to believe your unsubstantiated assertion that the lowest vacuum ever measured was 29.99 PSI.

Here’s an example from a source you love: Wikipedia! “”Below atmospheric” means that the absolute pressure is equal to the current atmospheric pressure (e.g. 29.92 inHg) minus the vacuum pressure in the same units. Thus a vacuum of 26 inHg is equivalent to an absolute pressure of 4 inHg (29.92 inHg - 26 inHg).”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum

Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS
marinera you are mistaken about boiling at room temps with boiling at 212%F

Not the same. you do not feel the heat cause it isn’t there but the result of being burned is there..

What is “212%F”?

Again, GSpot, you are mixing different concepts. Of course, as you’ve done this before in the thread, I don’t know whether you are talking about boiling or evaporation. (GSpotMassagerS - A revolutionary theory about blisters)

But let’s break it down one more time. Boiling and burning are two different things. Reduce pressure enough, and you can boil water at temperatures that do not burn or cook. My example of the spacesuit failure is a case in point. If your spacesuit fails in space, your fluids may boil, but your body will not be burned. It’s called ebullism: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebullism .

Hey, and here’s a bonus! Want to know what the pressure is where body fluids boil at body temperature? It’s 6.3 kPa (47 torr). (Note: kPa and torr are not interchangeable with PSI or inHg or mmHg.)

Note that 6.3 kPa compares to a normal atmospheric pressure of 101.325 kPa, so again, that’s a reduction in pressure far beyond the normal pumping vacuum range, once again showing that GSPotMassagerS’s revolutionary theory to be fundamentally flawed.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_pressure

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum…ans_and_animals

Originally Posted by marinera
So, at how much pressure should water start boiling at room-temp, in your hypothesis?

Originally Posted by marinera
Edit: in your experience, since you say you have already done it. How much was the pressure? Just to see if anyone else gets your same results or you are living in a different universe, you know.

Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS
about -12 PSI that is about 24-25 HG

Units? 24-25 inHg or 24-25 mmHg?
You’re mixing units again, in any case; PSI is different still from either inHg or mmHg.


For Lampwick, becoming hung like a donkey was the result of a total commitment.

Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS
……………..
marinera you are mistaken about boiling at room temps with boiling at 212%F

Not the same. you do not feel the heat cause it isn’t there but the result of being burned is there..

The heat is there or not? If the heat isn’t there, what is causing blisters isn’t the heat, is the pressure and/or friction.

Also, it could interest to you that blisters are never the result of “boiling water” or “vaporization” in the human body: it’s a naive idea. In example, when you have sunburns the blisters are caused by the UV rays; they hurt your skin that, as a protective reaction, develop blisters. It isn’t the water boiling: if it was, you were dead well earlier than blister born.

And adversely, if you get a sauna you don’t develop blisters: water is vaporizing everywhere inside the sauna except than in the human body.

Also, sweating isn’t “vaporization” or “boiling”.

You should re-read your elementary school-books, IMHO.

In reality, a pumping blister does not even compare to a burn blister. With a pump blister it seems like the top layer of skin bubbles up from fluid build up, and after you pop it it does not bother you at all. A burn blister can be painful for a week or more, because you burnt more than one layer of your skin.

A friend says a pumping blister is due to too much pressure at prolonged duration. He said If I was right about blistering then why do you get blood blisters when pumping? He said it is cause by the penis being pushed up against the side of the cylinder for a good bit of time under a lot of pressure and the blister is the same as when you do too much work and getting blisters on your hands. He said that you rub the side of the tube while pumping and it can either cause blood blistering or fluid blistering. He described it well and I think he could be right


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

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