Thunder's Place

The big penis and mens' sexual health source, increasing penis size around the world.

A revolutionary theory about blisters

123

A revolutionary theory about blisters

You know what happens when you touch something hot and that nasty blister comes up on you where you got burnt?

Let me explain what happens. The fluid in your body boils from the heat and makes the blister and when the blister cools the vapor or steam condenses and turns back into fluid that gets trapped under the skin.

When you vacuum the air out of a container with water in it the water will boil at room temperature. So when you use very high vacuum HGs and the fluid in the penis will do just like it does when you get burnt.

Water boils at 212 degrees F at sea level pressure witch is 14.7 pounds a square Inch

When you lower the pressure then you also lower the boiling point. That is a fact… Not my opinion

So when you blister when pumping it tells you that the fluid is actually boiling just as it does when you get burned.

So if you pump high enough to see or get blisters then you are pumping with too much vacuum.

Slack off the pressure before the skin starts turning dark cause you are cooking it. LOL but not funny.


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

Are you talking about pumping while in water? Because I believe pressure on the outside of your penis is different then the pressure inside your penis.

Mine’s blistered … for her pleasure. :)


" 'Cute'?! Like its got a smiley face on the end of it! I dont want a cute dick. I want a big scary dick! One that comes out growling, RAAAR!!!! A dick with teeth, RAR RAR RAR!!!! What happened? My dick bit me look at that!" - Rodney Carrington -

I share the following but in all sense I advocate sensible pumping regime. I have had some prolonged pumping sesssions and would not recommend them to everyone. However even on longer pumping sessions I never ever push to those limits, always lower pressure. Pumping till the point where blisters become evident does not make sense to me; it defeats the very purpose of pumping. Higher pressure does /= greater gains. We only have one cock and in this journey to meet our various objectiveswe have to apply common sense.

GSpotMassagerS, I am not so sure that the correlation that you have brought forth is applicable. I think there are verying types of blisters I do not think that the one cause by a boiling substances are the same as the ones due to high pressure pumping.


05/12/2005 : BPEL: 6.1"x EG:5.5" Current as of : 24/12/2011 : BPEL 7.87" x EG: 6.3" Long term Goal 8.5"x 6.4"

" There is only one option success; for failure is the refusal to persist"

You have to know that when you get burned the skin weakens and it blisters up. When you pump it will blister where the skin is at its weakest. I know some will know know about pressures and how it effect stuff. The truth is that the properties of water changes when different pressures is on it. You have to take in effect the the pressure on the penis effect how it reacts to different pressures. The truth it that you can boil water at room temperature. When it boils the burn weakens the skin and it blisters. When you pump then it will blister where the skin is the weakest.


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

I,m not so sure on your theory. Take a tube fill it half way,seal both ends and set the vacuum pressure to as High as your pump will go. See if the water boils. Now I have personally have had water in vacuum pipes in a industrial vacuum system. The plants vacuum system is monitored at 19.5 to 20 inches of mercury level. The water in those pipes never boil off. In fact it’s a daily maintenance requirement to drain off all that collected condensation. If what you say is true, then why is there a need to always drain off the condensation.

The FACT is that the higher the vacuum pressure the more likely you can draw, to the surface, internal fluids such as blood and water as the pressure is high enough to draw both internal air, water blood through the pores of your skin. The bottom line is don,t exceed 7 inches of mercury vacuum. I have personally noted that when I get a blister through pumping or hanging weights it’s always because I have exceed that threshold FOR me. Since no one is built exactly the same some people because of their toughness of their skin or the thickness can tolerate more or less vacuum pressure.

I suggest you take a glass tube and begin pumping the air out and I bet the water will start forming bubbles close to the bottom


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS
You know what happens when you touch something hot and that nasty blister comes up on you where you got burnt?

Let me explain what happens. The fluid in your body boils from the heat and makes the blister and when the blister cools the vapor or steam condenses and turns back into fluid that gets trapped under the skin.

When you vacuum the air out of a container with water in it the water will boil at room temperature. So when you use very high vacuum HGs and the fluid in the penis will do just like it does when you get burnt.

Water boils at 212 degrees F at sea level pressure witch is 14.7 pounds a square Inch

When you lower the pressure then you also lower the boiling point. That is a fact… Not my opinion

So when you blister when pumping it tells you that the fluid is actually boiling just as it does when you get burned.

So if you pump high enough to see or get blisters then you are pumping with too much vacuum.

Slack off the pressure before the skin starts turning dark cause you are cooking it. LOL but not funny.

I’m afraid you’re wrong on your theory, GSpotMassagerS.

According to http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.ed…tic/vappre.html , “Raising or lowering the pressure by about 28 mmHg will change the boiling point by 1°C.” I’m looking at the gauge on my pump right now. Increasing vacuum by five inches is about 120 mmHg. So if I’m pumping at five inches (and I generally pump at less than that), I have decreased the boiling point of water by a bit more than 4 degrees C; to 95.8 degrees C or 204 degrees F. Go crazy and pump at 10 inches (about 260 mm), and you’ve decreased boiling point by 9.3 degrees C; to 90.7 degrees C or a bit over 195 degrees.

You’re not going to boil your penis by pumping. If you could boil water by pumping at such relatively low levels, don’t you think that someone would have produced a cooking appliance that did that? I could throw a hot dog in the cylinder, pump it up and have boiled hot dogs for lunch for almost no expenditure of energy; a couple of squeezes of the pump handle.


For Lampwick, becoming hung like a donkey was the result of a total commitment.

Lampwick that is called a pressure cooker, where it enables the water to be heated to about 120 celcius before it boils instead off 100, thus enabling faser cooking rates. Alternatley if you were to lower the pressure to get water to boil at say 50 degrees then your food wouldn cook would it, food doesn’t cook at 50 degress.

Basically boiling occurs when vapour pressure (in this case fluids inside penis) equals the outside pressure (in this case inside the pump).

Roosrule12345:

I guess we need to separate out the two variables - boiling and heat.

Are you talking about 50 degrees C or F? If it’s F, then yes, I guess you could have boiling without cooking. Drop the pressure down far enough, to the absolute vacuum of space, and you’d boil and explode without cooking if your spacesuit failed.

If you’re talking Celsius, 50 degrees C equals 122 degrees F, and food does cook at those temperatures.

Originally Posted by roosrule12345
Basically boiling occurs when vapour pressure (in this case fluids inside penis) equals the outside pressure (in this case inside the pump).

My point was that at normal pumping vacuums (not pressure), water does not boil It’s not even close.

I know what pressure cookers are, and how they work, but that has nothing to do with pumping vacuums.


For Lampwick, becoming hung like a donkey was the result of a total commitment.

You have to take into effect the the body’s water has salt and other minerals and the body’s fluid evaporates at extremely low temps to begin with. You have to take more than water into effect when arguing what can or can not be done. The fluid of the body can and will boil faster than plain water.


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

Lowering the pressure does lower the boiling point - basic high school chemistry. I don’t think it’s as low as body temperture though. Might be a few degrees lower.

I have witnessed water boiling at room temperature at about 75 % F.. with little vacuum pressure. It was done in a big glass Jar so any high vacuum pressure would have broke it and made it implode. The body is at 98.6 % F so it wouldn’t take that much vacuum pressure to boil it at body temps


Become one with the pump. See the pump become the pump.

Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS
You have to take into effect the the body’s water has salt and other minerals and the body’s fluid evaporates at extremely low temps to begin with. You have to take more than water into effect when arguing what can or can not be done. The fluid of the body can and will boil faster than plain water.

Originally Posted by GSpotMassagerS

I have witnessed water boiling at room temperature at about 75 % F.. with little vacuum pressure. It was done in a big glass Jar so any high vacuum pressure would have broke it and made it implode. The body is at 98.6 % F so it wouldn’t take that much vacuum pressure to boil it at body temps

Funny - according to these sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling-point_elevation

http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askas…9/chem99501.htm

…just to cite a few, say that adding salt or sugar to water raises the boiling point; it does not lower it.

(For a practical and tasty demonstration of this point, made fudge. Add sugar to water and bring it to a boil; that will be about 26 degrees F/14 degrees C higher than plain water. Source: http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF8/871.html)

You assert that “the fluid of the body can and will boil faster than plain water”. Source?

You assert that it wouldn’t take that much vacuum pressure to boil water at body temperatures. Back to http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.ed…tic/vappre.html , “Raising or lowering the pressure by about 28 mmHg will change the boiling point by 1°C.” To take a boiling point of 100 degrees C/212 degrees F to 24 degrees C/75 degrees F means taking the boiling point down a staggering 76 degrees C, which would take, if my calculations are right, a reduction of 2128 mmHg.

By comparison, the gauge on the metal hand pump I use tops out at 30 inHg, or a mere 760 mmHg. It would take nearly three times that to bring the boiling temperature of water down to 75 degrees F.

Using body temperature of 98.6 degrees F doesn’t help your case much. That’s 37 degrees C, or a boiling point reduction of 63 degrees C, which would take a reduction in vacuum of 1764 mmHg, or well more than twice the 30 inHg/760 mmHg top end of the scale on my hand pump.

Again, if I’m wrong here somewhere, someone point it out; but please do so with math and science, not unsupported supposition and anecdote.

Mild vacuum is not going to boil your penis. Even vacuum that most of us here would consider extreme is not close.


For Lampwick, becoming hung like a donkey was the result of a total commitment.


Last edited by Lampwick : 11-27-2008 at .
Top
123

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:14 PM.