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Fractures

Fractures

I’m pretty sure that I have a minor penile fracture which is basically a small tear in the tunica.

I have had it for at least 5 years. There is a tiny bump, which I assume is a hematoma.

Is this something worth fixing via surgery?
It has never bothered me, until now as I am beggining PE

Originally Posted by andrewj
I’m pretty sure that I have a minor penile fracture which is basically a small tear in the tunica.

I have had it for at least 5 years. There is a tiny bump, which I assume is a hematoma.

Is this something worth fixing via surgery?
It has never bothered me, until now as I am beggining PE


Has a doctor confirmed it?


Walk slowly but never backwards.

No.
It was only last night that I actually realised what it was.

Of course a doctor would be the best idea, but I am just wondering if minor fractures always require fixing.

A hematoma would not last for five years, nor would a tear in the tunica. A tunica tear, or “fracture” (which is an unusual use of that word), would not be considered minor. Any amount of leakage would cause you to have a fairly widespread purple hematoma and the inability to get erections. Your bump is something else. If it is not painful and hasn’t changed in five years, it may not be anything to worry about.

Just to be on the safer side go visit a doctor to rule out any other problems


Walk slowly but never backwards.

Penile fracture

Penile fracture is the traumatic rupture of the corpus cavernosum. Traumatic rupture of the penis is relatively uncommon and is considered a urologic emergency.

Sudden blunt trauma or abrupt lateral bending of the penis in an erect state can break the markedly thinned and stiff tunica albuginea, resulting in a fractured penis. One or both corpora may be involved, and concomitant injury to the penile urethra may occur. Urethral trauma is more common when both corpora cavernosa are injured.

Penile rupture can usually be diagnosed based solely on history and physical examination findings; however, in equivocal cases, diagnostic cavernosography or MRI should be performed. Concomitant urethral injury must be considered; therefore, preoperative retrograde urethrographic studies should generally be performed.

Http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic3415.htm

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