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Is there a doctor in the house?

I just the results back on my testosterone levels.

At 40 yrs old:

TSH was 3.43 Ref Range= 0.34-5.60 UNITS= uIU/mL

Free Test was 16.9 Ref Range= 5.0-40.0 UNITS=pg/mL

It looks like my TSH is on the high side of average, and the free is on the low side of average. Does anyone know what this means?

Doc says “looks good” on the review. But, I’ve always been a high testosterone guy.

I do not want to lose my sex drive etc. Any thoughts or suggestions to boost testosterone naturally?


Paraphrased: It is not the critic who counts: The credit belongs to the man in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, who, at the best, knows the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.

Are you running, weight-lifting etc., lately?

Exercise, particularly weight training would be good to elevate your testosterone!

Also Google it when you get a chance

Originally Posted by marinera
Are you running, weight-lifting etc., lately?

Yes, until recently, at a really high intensity. (I have a sinus infection that has been lingering for weeks) I work out hardcore on intervals, and that night and/or the next day, my sinuses act up, and I feel light headed with a low grade fever. (feels like that anyway)


Paraphrased: It is not the critic who counts: The credit belongs to the man in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, who, at the best, knows the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.

Do you get sinuses action if you train lighter?

Not generally. I have a really difficult time training, or doing anything lightly. (except for PE)


Paraphrased: It is not the critic who counts: The credit belongs to the man in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, who, at the best, knows the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.

TSH=Thyroid Stimulating Hormone? Free what? Testosterone? Was it a serum testosterone?


Excuse me while I whip this out.

Originally Posted by harshlanguage
TSH=Thyroid Stimulating Hormone? Free what? Testosterone? Was it a serum testosterone?

Yes, TSH, I beleive that is correct. Yes, Free Testosterone.


Paraphrased: It is not the critic who counts: The credit belongs to the man in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, who, at the best, knows the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.

TSH doesn’t really have anything to do with Testosterone levels and your results are different from what my lab book says so it is difficult to interpret.
If everything is within the normal range and not on an edge, high or low, you are “normal”. Here is what one of the subscription medical websites says about serum testosterone values. Notice they are in different units so it makes interpretation impossible..

Testosterone, serum

Males: 3.0–10.0

Females: 0.3–0.7 ng/mL

[Males: 10–35

Females: 1.0–2.4 nmol/L]

Testosterone is the principal male sex hormone, produced by the Leydig cells of the testes. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is produced in the adrenal cortex, testes, and ovaries and is the main precursor for serum testosterone in women. In normal males after puberty, the testosterone level is twice as high as all androgens in females.

In serum, it is largely bound to albumin (38%) and to a specific steroid hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) (60%), but it is the free hormone (2%) that is physiologically active.

The total testosterone level measures both bound and free testosterone in the serum (by immunoassay).

Free or bioavailable testosterone may be calculated or measured.

Increased in: Idiopathic sexual precocity (in boys, levels may be in adult range), adrenal hyperplasia (boys), adrenocortical tumors, trophoblastic disease during pregnancy, idiopathic hirsutism, virilizing ovarian tumors, arrhenoblastoma, virilizing luteoma, testicular feminization (normal or moderately elevated), cirrhosis (through increased SHBG), hyperthyroidism. Drugs: anticonvulsants, barbiturates, estrogens, oral contraceptives (through increased SHBG).

Decreased in: Hypogonadism (primary and secondary, orchidectomy, Klinefelter syndrome, uremia, hemodialysis, hepatic insufficiency, ethanol [men]). Drugs: digoxin, spironolactone, acarbose.

The diagnosis of male hypogonadism is based on clinical symptoms and signs plus laboratory confirmation of low AM total serum testosterone levels on two different occasions. Levels below 3.0 ng/mL should be treated. Free testosterone should be measured in symptomatic patients with normal total testosterone levels. Obtain serum luteinizing hormone and FSH levels to distinguish between primary (hypergonadotropic) and secondary (hypogonadotropic) hypogonadism. Hypogonadism associated with aging (andropause) may present a mixed picture, with low testosterone levels and low to low-normal gonadotropin levels.

In men, there is a diurnal variation in serum testosterone with a 20% elevation in levels in the evenings.
Treat Endocrinol 2005;4:293. [PMID: 16185098]Ann Clin Biochem 2006;43(Pt 1):3. [PMID: 16390603]Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2006;20:177. [PMID: 16772150]


Excuse me while I whip this out.

Originally Posted by harshlanguage
TSH doesn’t really have anything to do with Testosterone levels and your results are different from what my lab book says so it is difficult to interpret.
If everything is within the normal range and not on an edge, high or low, you are “normal”. Here is what one of the subscription medical websites says about serum testosterone values. Notice they are in different units so it makes interpretation impossible..

Testosterone, serum

Males: 3.0–10.0

Females: 0.3–0.7 ng/mL

[Males: 10–35

Females: 1.0–2.4 nmol/L]

Testosterone is the principal male sex hormone, produced by the Leydig cells of the testes. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is produced in the adrenal cortex, testes, and ovaries and is the main precursor for serum testosterone in women. In normal males after puberty, the testosterone level is twice as high as all androgens in females.

In serum, it is largely bound to albumin (38%) and to a specific steroid hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) (60%), but it is the free hormone (2%) that is physiologically active.

The total testosterone level measures both bound and free testosterone in the serum (by immunoassay).

Free or bioavailable testosterone may be calculated or measured.

Increased in: Idiopathic sexual precocity (in boys, levels may be in adult range), adrenal hyperplasia (boys), adrenocortical tumors, trophoblastic disease during pregnancy, idiopathic hirsutism, virilizing ovarian tumors, arrhenoblastoma, virilizing luteoma, testicular feminization (normal or moderately elevated), cirrhosis (through increased SHBG), hyperthyroidism. Drugs: anticonvulsants, barbiturates, estrogens, oral contraceptives (through increased SHBG).

Decreased in: Hypogonadism (primary and secondary, orchidectomy, Klinefelter syndrome, uremia, hemodialysis, hepatic insufficiency, ethanol [men]). Drugs: digoxin, spironolactone, acarbose.

The diagnosis of male hypogonadism is based on clinical symptoms and signs plus laboratory confirmation of low AM total serum testosterone levels on two different occasions. Levels below 3.0 ng/mL should be treated. Free testosterone should be measured in symptomatic patients with normal total testosterone levels. Obtain serum luteinizing hormone and FSH levels to distinguish between primary (hypergonadotropic) and secondary (hypogonadotropic) hypogonadism. Hypogonadism associated with aging (andropause) may present a mixed picture, with low testosterone levels and low to low-normal gonadotropin levels.

In men, there is a diurnal variation in serum testosterone with a 20% elevation in levels in the evenings.
Treat Endocrinol 2005;4:293. [PMID: 16185098]Ann Clin Biochem 2006;43(Pt 1):3. [PMID: 16390603]Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2006;20:177. [PMID: 16772150]


Uh, wow, thanks for making the effort to write all of the above out. But, um, what does it mean? As long as I am my usual horny self, don’t sweat it? I guess that’s how I’ll interpret this. I guess. :confused:


Paraphrased: It is not the critic who counts: The credit belongs to the man in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, who, at the best, knows the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.

The beauty of cut and paste, more info than you can stand with the click of a mouse. Yes, according to your results and your reference ranges, you are perfectly “normal”. Now go have fun.


Excuse me while I whip this out.

You’ve always “been a high-testosterone guy”? How often and for what reasons have you had your testosterone level checked in the past? And why are you affraid of losing your sex drive?


Start: 8"BPEL 5.9" girth Current: 8.5"BPEL 6.5" girth Goal: 9"NBPEL 6.7" girth

I am a MD and I am treating thyroid diseases every day.

The relatively high TSH indicates a weakness of the thyroid, you should have your “thyroid peroxidase antibody level” checked. If you are fat, tired, depressed, thyroxin medication may be indicated. You should see a thyroid specialist in your country (endocrinologist).

The free test is normal, no reason to worry about it.


Later - ttt

Originally Posted by suziesun12
You’ve always “been a high-testosterone guy”? How often and for what reasons have you had your testosterone level checked in the past? And why are you affraid of losing your sex drive?

Yes, it’s just that, recently, I got back training at a high intensity AND started PE for the hell of it. I started having some EQ issues, (not too bad, but enough to get my attention) so I wanted to check on the testosterone levels I have.

I’m 40, and I want to be very much sexually active well into my 70’s, so I’m just kind of evaluating where I’m at on all sorts of different things.

Thanks, also, Ticktick. I am about +- 30 lbs overweight. (but I’m in very good cardio vascular condition resting heart rate at 51 bpm and bp at 120/75) So, who knows, stress over the economy and angst over the unknown could be contributing.


Paraphrased: It is not the critic who counts: The credit belongs to the man in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, who, at the best, knows the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.

(I like the adaption of German angst into English.)


Et... la nuit se continue. C\'est vrai. Elle est complètement dechirée - ma tête.

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