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Infra red wrist strap

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Shiver wrote:
“Those wraps work from body heat. Maybe using one of those wraps to convert a regular heat pad might work. If you’re taking the cylinder route then I’d start with a thickwall cylinder which will take up most of the length of the LED head, reduce cracking potential and improve the seal possibilities. A good pillar drill with a dremel grinder tip or very unagressive drill bit would probably be a useful setup too.

I still think the wrist strap would provide the easiest and cheapest solution though.”

I didn’t read this closely enough and thought you meant wrapping the wrist straps around the tube. I have not looked at the graphs, but what about unbreakable glass? As a kid, we had some long tall unbreakable water glasses that could be modified into a pump cylinder. It seems to me that one would be much closer to the finish line by finding a and modifying a tube material and then wrapping it with an IR source than the other way around.

Hey Guys,

About temperature measurements, I’ve been able to measure in-situ tube temperature using a simple radio shack dual thermistor sensor. The sensor lead is small enough to slip right along with your unit into the tube and form a seal. One or two extra wraps with the donut prevention wrap is enough to hold it in place during insertion. You will get a temporary “dent” or furough but it’s a fairly inexpensive way to get reasonably accurate data +/- 2 deg F.

Also, part of your energy loss by applying radiation to the surface of the tube is caused by reflection due to the index of refraction of the tube. This will happen irrespective of plastic or glass. So, low energy radiant sources fight an uphill battle.

All the Best,

MrTiPS

Modesto:

Well there is a discrepancy in my measurement methods. When I use the thermotex I find that it will not heat up the unit much at all no matter how long I leave it, unless I use some constriction method. The bloodflow ability in the penis is just too efficient a heat removal system unless I slow it down to a fair degree.

In a tube I do not have the constriction device, but since the tube is digging in to the base quite hard I assumed that there would be little blood flow there. I may well be wrong on that. There is a certain fuzzy deep feeling which I have learned to recognise as ‘enough’ heating time, and that never occurs with the tube. If my unit touches the side of the tube though, it can be uncomfortably hot - hot enough for it to be an impractical exercise for me.

If you put a heating element inside the tube then you remove that variable entirely though.

Originally Posted by penismith
Thanks to Shiver, a different and perhaps better type of IR wrist strap:

http://www.petatech-co.com/E-pc.htm

PenisSmith,

What Shiver describes above seems to match what I posted earlier in another thread about the Thermotex - that is, it can emit IR radiation at 8.6 - 9.1 micron which sits right on the edge of perhaps the least transparent portion of the tube’s transmission spectra. Based on his observation that the tube wall gets hot (in time) but he feels little heating by radiation suggests this is happening and it’s quite unfortunate because the Thermotex looks like a really good product.

That said, I remember other pumpers in other threads discussing water pumping and some using hot water in the tube. A very thermally efficient medium like water in the tube would rapidly couple the heat from a thermotex wrapped around the tube directly into anything in the tube and it would prevent the inner tube wall from getting too hot.

I tried warm water pumping and I couldn’t keep the water warm enough for long enough to make much of a difference but I also didn’t have a good wrap for the tube like a Thermotex. However, I think it really gets cumbersome. Pumping with water in the tube is tough enough let alone juggle a heating pad or wrap. Maybe it’s possible if a proper systematic approach could be devised because heated water really gets your unit up to temperature and will keep it there if you can keep the water heated properly.

Just a thought.

Also, now that I am on the correct thread, again my apologies for not crediting you properly for your starting this thread and the many contributions you have made here and in many other threads.

Regards,

MrTiPS

Water pumping is interesting. I’ve thinking about how to do it and have decided that using a constant temperature bath might be the solution. The tube would need an inlet and outlet, with some valves to control the flow. Some constant temperature baths have a circulation pump built in and have inlet and outlet ports attached. Actually, I was looking at a constant temperature bath to provide hot water to pump with and to also heat a jacketed tube I’ve been contemplating building.

Originally Posted by MrTips
PenisSmith,

What Shiver describes above seems to match what I posted earlier in another thread about the Thermotex - that is, it can emit IR radiation at 8.6 - 9.1 micron which sits right on the edge of perhaps the least transparent portion of the tube’s transmission spectra. Based on his observation that the tube wall gets hot (in time) but he feels little heating by radiation suggests this is happening and it’s quite unfortunate because the Thermotex looks like a really good product.

Also, now that I am on the correct thread, again my apologies for not crediting you properly for your starting this thread and the many contributions you have made here and in many other threads.

Regards,

MrTiPS

Thanks for the kind words MrTiPS. In terms of the wrist straps, I am still considering them for hanging as well. These may not be great for pumping but could revolutionise hanging.

Originally Posted by MrTips
That said, I remember other pumpers in other threads discussing water pumping and some using hot water in the tube. A very thermally efficient medium like water in the tube would rapidly couple the heat from a thermotex wrapped around the tube directly into anything in the tube and it would prevent the inner tube wall from getting too hot.

Regards,

MrTiPS

Just a thought, but worth mentioning: The Thermotex I have is 240VAC. Don’t know if that will affect anyones water heating decision :)

Here’s an interesting snippet I found on netrition.com this week:

Quote
SUNDERLAND, England, Nov 21, 2004 (United Press International via COMTEX) — Two British doctors have said they believe infra-red light therapy could be used to lessen the appearance of wrinkles, the BBC reported Sunday.

Dr. Jim Haslam and Dr. Gordon Dougal based the treatment on a cold sore therapy they developed in 2001, the BBC said. The therapy works by stimulating elastin, the part of the skin that gives it tightness.

The doctors researched the procedure at Sunderland University. Ninety-five percent of 40 volunteers said the hand-held machine, called Restorelite, made a difference in the appearance of wrinkles.

Hi Shiver,

”. . . 240VAC - Don’t know if that will affect anyones water heating decision.”

Well, there’s a song that comes to mind - lyrics go something like “youuuuu, light up my life . . . ” -

So, at first blush 240VAC gives me pause. However, as long as the heating pad insulation stayed intact, even a klutzy water pumper (like me) would be OK - and, you’ve got about 200 mils of plastic tube wall thickness in the way with acrylic as one heck of a good insulator. That said, I am currently working on an experimental design that would be intrinsically safe and quite easy to use at far lower voltages that 240V AC.

As for the cold sore therapy, there is no question that IR energy is beneficial to healing. That, too, is part of the investigative stuff I am doing.

Thanks for your posts and all the best,

MrTiPS

I don’t know why the thermotex is designed like it is. Almost every other device based on the same idea works between 4-6volts. The cold sore therapy was more about encouraging elastin, which I belief is lacking in a PE’d dick compared to a regular one.

I’m pretty sure the Thermotex models sold in the US run from 110 VAC. Still, water and volts don’t mix. You could use an isolation transformer to prevent shorts to ground, but there’s still the problem of shorts from leg to leg.

If other units use 4-6 volts, maybe Thermotex works by wiring different heating cells in series. If so, maybe they could just be rewired in parallel and run from much lower voltage.


Enter your measurements in the PE Database.

I’m sure in the US it is 110v, but I don’t understand why it needs even that since as far as I can tell it’s the same carbon weave impregnated with a ceramic powder of some kind. The power is connected in parallel to each pad, and I suspect the only reason it is mains voltage is so that they don’t ave to use an additional power supply (it’s an extremely basic design). The thermal control cut-offs that are inline between the power and pad are rated at mains voltage, but a similar functioning one at a safe voltage could work also I would think.

If I could get my camera to work on this old PC then I’d send a pic, but the USB drivers are screwed, and all the registry hacking over the last year hasn’t got it working (22 years in the tech field and I can’t even get a damn camera to plug in!). When I get a new PC (perhaps soon if I head out to Canada for the winter season) then I’m sure it’ll just plug and play. I did look up the Thermotex part numbers with the manufacturer once, but I can’t do it just now as I’m wearing it :) If I think on, I’ll post them later tonight.

Well, I finally got around to testing the transmission of IR through my tube. I used a pice of polska kiebasa as my test penis. I cut off a 6” piece and let it warm up to ambient temperature. I stuck a meat thermometer into it and inserted it into my tube. I placed my IR wand against the tube and turned it on. After 30 minutes, there was no change in temperature of the kielbasa. None at all!

I measured the tube’s temperature and it was about 120 degrees at the point where the IR wand contacted it. WTF? No transmission of IR at all? So I decided to see if I could warm up the kielbasa outside of the tube. I placed the IR wand about 1/16” away from the kielbasa and let it sit for 30 minutes. There was NO temperature change in the kielbasa! WTF? again!

Next, I placed the IR wand against the kiebasa. After several minutes, the temperature of the kielbasa began to rose. SHEEIT! My “IR” wand heats by conduction?!

Either my IR source is not real IR, or it is so weak it can’t jump a 1/16” gap. So, now I need to find a more powerful, true IR source. Anyone else working on transmitting IR through a tube?

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