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Hanging Question: Fatigue or not

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Hanging Question: Fatigue or not

Fellow hangers,

I’m fairly new to the sport of hanging. After a little over 2 months of PE, I started hanging with 5 lbs. I have a low LOT (~7 or 8), so I hang primarily SO while sitting in a chair.

5 lbs felt like nothing, so I upped it to 8.

Here’s my question: Should I keep the weight as low as possible for as long as possible, or should I keep increasing until I feel fatigue?

There seem to be opposing opinions on this subject, so I though I’d throw it out for direct responses. Thanks.

Quote
There seem to be opposing opinions on this subject

That about sums it up :)

The conventional wisdom is that you should keep the weight to the absolute minimum required to produce fatigue. Time is more important to hanging gains than weight — or so the story goes.

I have found that using a heavy weight to produce penile exhaustion in one or two sets, followed by several sets at a light weight adequate to sustain the intensity, has produced my best results. I would have killed my dick, however, if earlier in my PE career I had tried the heavy-duty weights I now use to begin a hanging session.

It seems like you’ve read well and are prepared for a safe hanging journey. As long as you’re hanging for at least a total of 60 or 80 minutes per session, you should be okay gradually increasing the weight until you find something that fatigues your ligs or tunica.

Also, I should add that if you’re still in your first few days of hanging, wait another week before you increase weight. Much of the fatigue from hanging carries over from day to day and accumulates over time. It wasn’t until my fourth or fifth hanging day that I began to feel real tiredness and soreness in my ligs. Likewise, if I take a substantial break now and return thereafter to hanging, I tend not to feel much fatigue until several consecutive days back into the routine.

Thanks, PG. I’ll take it very slowly. I also like the idea of varying the weight between sets.

Originally Posted by ModestoMan

5 lbs felt like nothing, so I upped it to 8.

To expound on something Para-G said, a 60% jump in weight is not a proper weight increase.
Try 6 lbs. and see how that feels. From my experience, I notice a substantial difference in stress
for every single pound I add to the hanger.


Yeeeeeeeeeaaaaarrrrrrrrrrgh! ~Howard Dean Illustrations & Diagrams PE -- What's it all about? Read this.

Originally Posted by Ramrod
From my experience, I notice a substantial difference in stress
for every single pound I add to the hanger.

Isn’t THAT the truth! I have 2,3, & 5 pound weights, as well as 3 golf weights (which total 1 pound). I’ve been hanging them in combination, and adding just 1 pound can really make a difference.


Start 6/13/04: 6.0 BPEL x 5.125 EG (midshaft) Current 10/17/04: 6.938 BPEL x 5.625 EG (midshaft) Come on 7! Disclaimer: I'm not an advanced member, but my member is advancing. ;)

I understand that small changes in weight can make big differences, but I still feel I haven’t reached fatigue. In the 2 months since I started PE’ing, I’ve been pulling pretty damn hard on my willy—it’s a tough little organ. So I think I’ve already gotten some conditioning.

I’ve been at 8 lbs for about a week. At first, I primarily felt skin burn, as my skin began to stretch. I do feel some tension in my tunica, especially when I get out of the chair and bend over, so my torso is about 90 degrees to the ground. But I wouldn’t go so far as to say I feel fatigue in my tunica. By the way, I feel nothing in my ligs (possibly because skin is still the limiting factor when pulling SD or BTC).

My question is more philosophical. Is it really necessary to work to fatigue at all? I’ve seen posts advocating long term hanging with fairly light weight, and especially with the use of heat. Some suggest that this works better over the long run than hanging with the weight that causes fatigue. It also has the benefit of not toughening the tissues to the point that further gains become progressively more difficult to attain.

So, my question really is, do you buy this theory that less (weight) is more when hanging (assuming time and heat are added), or don’t you.

Should I try long and hot light-weight sessions, or is this just a waste of time?

The more you hang the better chance you have for gains. I think with hanging more=better gains. Bigger”bib” used to hang all day. You should hang long and with your max weight and drop down if you have to. But listen to the advice of the guys above don’t increase weight to fast.


I haven't failed, I've found 10,000 ways that don't work. Thomas Edison (1847-1931)

>”Is it really necessary to work to fatigue at all?”<

I think it is crucial to making gains.

I liken the microfibers to fishing line:
You can buy fishing line that “tests” out at 5 lb, 7 lb, 15 lb, etc.

Let’s say you go fishing in a lake that has no bass over 10 lbs in weight.
You’re using 15 lb/test fishing line.
Result: The fishing line won’t be stressed out. It will not break. It will not stretch.

We want to our fishing lines to break.
So go out there and start fishing for really big fish with fishing line that will break.

Okay, that doesn’t make any sense.
Let me put it this way: Your particular fibers may take 8 lbs of stress to start tearing.
So it isn’t much use to you to hang 10 sets/day with 5 lbs.


Yeeeeeeeeeaaaaarrrrrrrrrrgh! ~Howard Dean Illustrations & Diagrams PE -- What's it all about? Read this.

Got it. But I can’t figure out whether connective tissue behaves like fishing line. It’s made of lots of fibers wound together. That sounds similar. But one is biological and the other isn’t. Does it make any difference?

It is not a simple matter of whether to use less or more weight. The weight needs to be adjusted according to the time you have and your feeling from the workload.

1) Allot as much time as you can to hang each day.

2) Use the least amount of weight needed to attain and maintain a good stretch during the time you have available.

But hobby, a “good stretch” can be achieved with a lower weight than it takes to cause tears.
It’s probably a matter of semantics, but just stretching won’t overtax your fibers until it is stretched beyond it’s limit.

A weightlifter needs to be “challenged” by the amount of weight he uses.
If he works out with 3 lb dumbbells his muscles won’t respond.


Yeeeeeeeeeaaaaarrrrrrrrrrgh! ~Howard Dean Illustrations & Diagrams PE -- What's it all about? Read this.

All the anatomical theorizing is interesting, but, as Cervantes said, the proof of the pudding is in the eating.

And the fact is that impressive gains have been had by a variety of “hanging” methods — from very lightweight ADS to heavy-duty quick sessions.

It would seem obvious that the ideal combination would be high weights and long periods, but until Tube (it was Tube, right?) conducts his PE monkey studies, or we compile more systematic data on PEers’ results here, we cannot really predict what will work best for any given individual.

Originally Posted by Ramrod
But hobby, a “good stretch” can be achieved with a lower weight than it takes to cause tears.
It’s probably a matter of semantics, but just stretching won’t overtax your fibers until it is stretched beyond it’s limit.

Yes, semantics. What is “fatigue” anyway? And how does the “fatigue” felt correlate to the stresses imposed? Maybe one guy has a low threshold of feeling and another very high. “Feel” isn’t necessarily a good gauge of the stress imposed. Granted, it’s the best thing we have to go on, but many gain without ever reaching total fatigue. I think I’ve only hit it once or twice.

>A weightlifter needs to be “challenged” by the amount of weight he uses. If he works out with 3 lb dumbbells his muscles won’t respond.<

A poor analogy in this case, but I understand what you mean. The factors important in building muscle or strength aren’t the same as needed to make connective tissue permanently deform. I agree though that enough tension is needed to do the job, and if you don’t use enough you’re wasting your time.

It would be helpful to understand how connective tissues stretch. Metals stretch according to forces between atoms. However, as I understand it, connective tissues consist of long-chain molecules. When stretching connective tissue, I doubt the molecules themselves stretch—this would make no sense. It must be the spaces between the molecules that increase, as different molecules are pulled apart and disentangled from one another.

The analogy to stretching a metal wire is interesting, but I’m not convinced it’s accurate. For example, rules for elastic and plastic deformation may not apply to tangled fibers, where the fibers (molecules) themselves don’t stretch.

I think some reading is in order. Anybody know any good reference materials?

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