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Training Progression

Training Progression

Going to throw some ideas out here for discussion.

There are a lot of training programs out there on these forums. They include just about everything you could want. Length exercises, girth exercises and erection quality exercises. They tell you what to do and how often to do it. But there is one crucial aspect which is rarely looked upon. That is the progression of the workout. That is the idea of training progression. Making timely increases in the intensity of the workouts.

There is no debate that the intensity of a workout must be progressively increased as time goes by. It is no good following the same program for two years expecting to gain at the same rate throughout the entire two years.

Growth is a result of your penis adapting to new external forces. Once the adaptation has happened your penis is now tough enough to handle these forces. No further growth is required.

Therefore to force further adaptations new forces need to be introduced. This is the idea behind progressive training.

It is no accident that when you walk into a gym the biggest guys are pushing the biggest weights. Pushing smaller weights won’t give these big guys any growth because then they would be simply applying forces to their body which their current body is sufficient at handling. And because their current body is good enough for the job no growth is required. These big guys didn’t get their enormous biceps from training with 10 lb dumbells since they were 14. No, they progressively increased the intensity.

There are two sayings which have been floating around the gyms of the world for decades now which apply to this topic.
- “To have your body looking like it has never looked before, you must push yourself to levels which you have never pushed yourself before”
- “The best workout is the one that you have never done”

The idea of increasing the intensity of a workout is crucial to maintaining progress. It totally confuses me as to why so many programs are written which don’t make any mention of this. It hurts me to read training logs from our members showing the member doing the exact same exercise for 4 months and then asking on the final page of the thread why his gains have slowed down.

It may be that whoever is writing the training programs is either too inexperienced to make any suggestions as to how often intensity should be increased and by how much. Or it could be that this concept is completely alien to them.

Whichever it is it can no longer be ignored. Progression of intensity is one of the most basic and essential aspects of any training program.

The days of the “I have been doing 100 jelqs every day for the past year and haven’t gained anything for 6 months” threads should be long over.


Goal -

To be bigger than I was yesterday

Did the term “deconditioning break” start here or did it come from the world of athletics?


Sept. 4, '07: BPEL 6.875 inches, EG widest 5.25

Goal: Double digits

In the world of athletics “deconditioning breaks” tend to have psychological motives. When people in athletics stop making gains it’s usually because their head isn’t in the right place to make the effort to step up the intensity of the workout. This usually happens after following a program for a long time. You become less switched on due to the repetitive nature of the workout.

The deconditioning break in athletics is usually just go give the mind a rest. Then when you return to training you are generally very pumped up, enough so that you can push through that last barrier you faced.


Goal -

To be bigger than I was yesterday

Thank you for your explanation. I honestly did not know that, and find it sincerely interesting.

I agree with you almost completely, except concerning the direction of change. There is more than one direction to go if you find that your gains have stalled, even more than 2 ways to go.

One can increase or decrease intensity. Some, including myself, have found that amazing things can happen from actually decreasing the intensity of their PE efforts.

Or, I also know that when building muscles and coordination in athletics, sometimes progress can be had by changing things laterally. By that I mean keeping the same intensity and determination, but simply changing the actual exercises performed, even when targeting the exact same muscle or muscle group.

A lateral change in PE should also be considered. Perhaps different stretches or longer jelqs might be the answer for those who have stalled.

I agree, being completely stalled and continuing with the same routine is dumb. Then complaining about it is worse. But automatically thinking that the only way to change is to increase intensity in my opinion is why many continue to stall, and/or get injured, and give up on PE.


Sept. 4, '07: BPEL 6.875 inches, EG widest 5.25

Goal: Double digits

Here is another way of putting it:

I am trying to increase my chest strength. I can currently bench press 250 lbs, and my goal is 300.

I am doing an incremental routine of bench pressing every day, seven days per week. This is the exact same routine I have done since day one, and I have done it every day since the first day. I have been doing this routine for 4 months.

My problem is I can still only bench press a maximum of 250lbs, some days not even that.

What would you say I am doing wrong? What should I change? Should I increase the intensity by lifting heavier weights? Maybe I should do the routine twice per day?

I am not an expert in weight training, but I have done some. If I were giving me advice, I would say I am not giving my muscles a chance to recover and grow, and I need to reduce the intensity of my overall routine, either in days off or amount of weight.

What would be your advice if I only advanced 5 lbs to 255 lbs maximum ability working this hard this often?

So what might be happening to the guy who has been PE-ing for 4 months? He might actually be over training, even if he has gotten some gains.

Status I don’t mean to belabor my point, but people other than you and I read this, and I want to make sure I have explained myself in an understandable way so that everyone can decide for themselves.


Sept. 4, '07: BPEL 6.875 inches, EG widest 5.25

Goal: Double digits

Increasing the intensity does not necessarily mean to increase the frequency of workouts. In fact that should be discouraged. The tissue needs time to recover.

In fact in weight training, a lot of newbies train the same muscle groups day after day. Doing 6 full body workouts per week. In their case on of the most beneficial changes that they can do is to decrease their training frequency and give their muscles time to recovery. The number one key principal in bodybuilding is that your targeted muscles should be given at least 48 hours of recovery time between sessions. As for the days where you are in the gym training the muscle, you should be at your maximum intensity that your body can handle.

However discussion about the amount of rest needed between PE sessions would require a thread of its own.

I remember in my early days of bodybuilding speaking to a very well respected trainer at my local gym. He was a former wrestler and was extremely well respected by the young guys in the gym. He told me that it is a lot harder for us natural guys to make progress. Steroid users don’t need to do much, the juice just about does the work for them. However us natural guys have to literally train to the point of throwing up every single time we train.

It is this continuous linear progression of intensity that brings the results.
Of course lateral changes are always on the cards. Every 6 or so weeks changes in the exercises being performed is typical. Things like switching barbell bench press for dumbbell bench press is typical.

But the point is that in the bodybuilding world, lateral changes are often resorted to when linear progression becomes difficult or begins to return very marginal results. What I’m saying is that, when throwing on additional weight onto the bar stops giving you good gains thats when you should consider changing exercises.

So how does this relate to our PE programs?

Basically what I’m saying is that linear progression of intensity should be a part of every training routine.

Your training program shouldn’t say “200 jelqs” or “20 minutes of jelqing”. Instead it should be “Jelq - How many I did last session +20” or “Jelq- How long i jelqed for last session + 2 minutes”

So for example, if last session you did 250 jelqs then go for 270 this time and so on.

When this type of progressive system fails that is when a change in exercise should be considered. But in my oppinion sticking to the same intensity (for example : 200 jelqs per day) is only asking for gains to quickly come to a halt.


Goal -

To be bigger than I was yesterday

Stretching recommendations vary depending upon the source. I’ve read 2-3 days per week; at least 3 days per week; 3-5 days per week, and so on. In the PE world, I’ve read of people who practice stretching every day.

The difference between stretching as one does for say their hamstrings, is that stretch involves the lengthening of a muscle, with an ultimate goal of improved range of motion (and/or stability in that range of motion).

PE stretching is mainly focused on the suspensory ligament which right there is completely different than the above mentioned stretch. Ligaments can be stretched, but are generally NOT stretched because ligaments connect bone to bone (tendons connect bone to muscle), and the ligament’s job is to maintain stability of the joint.

If you stretch a ligament, it will deform (such as when you twist your ankle, it will be more prone to twisting again because the ligaments have been stretched/deformed).

The suspensory ligament connecting the penis is cut in surgery. Since that’s the case, then stretch the hell out of that ligament so it will deform and lengthen. During a good stretch I begin feeling that ligament pulled, then as I SLOWLY increase the intensity of that stretch, I feel the gentle pain transfer into my penis base (like an inch deep inside my skin). There is no blood supply to this ligament. All it will do is slowly try to revert back to its original size, hopefully you have stretched it so it cannot.

Bottom line: stretch as much as possible. Maybe even throw in two stretch sessions a day.

In terms of the pressure exercises such as the jelq, horse, uli, clamp, steamroller running over penis ;) , they cause a biological reaction where your body has to adapt to this stress (by enlarging the penis). It is still unclear how the body adapts to it (to my knowledge, there are no studies where someone enlarged their penis and an inner tissue sample was taken to see how the body copes with the stress). However, since you are dealing with tissue with a blood supply to it (and nerves), you need to give it time to heal. Usually I’d jelq for up to a half hour 5 x week, then lay off on the weekends, but try to keep my penis lightly engorged (like a 10% erection).

Yes, the body will adapt to this, which is why you should give a slight increase from time to time (whether it be increase the # of jelqs, or add a more advanced routine like horses pumping, clamping, ulis, orange bends, VVC’s new one, who else am I leaving out? :D )

However, the most important thing is that you stay consistent and stick with what works for you. If you gain an inch in 6 months, don’t automatically think that if you hang or clamp, you will gain 2 inches in the next 6 months - although it seems to be the perfect way of a PE regime, I have YET to see any credible source where that has happened to. Usually the PE kings have stuck with their routines for a long time, and modified them *slightly*.


PEing since Jan 1st, 2003


Last edited by Wt282 : 01-09-2008 at .

Originally Posted by status135
Increasing the intensity does not necessarily mean to increase the frequency of workouts. In fact that should be discouraged. The tissue needs time to recover.

In fact in weight training, a lot of newbies train the same muscle groups day after day. Doing 6 full body workouts per week. In their case on of the most beneficial changes that they can do is to decrease their training frequency and give their muscles time to recovery. The number one key principal in bodybuilding is that your targeted muscles should be given at least 48 hours of recovery time between sessions. As for the days where you are in the gym training the muscle, you should be at your maximum intensity that your body can handle.

However discussion about the amount of rest needed between PE sessions would require a thread of its own.

Of course I couldn’t agree more. My only addition is that you need to be SURE you are giving yourself enough recovery time before increasing anything in PE. If you are not sure, you will most likely over train and get no gains. It seems that many men have this automatic increase to blame for all of a sudden having their gains grind to a stop. Then they increase even more, still get no gains, and so on.

From what I have read not only is each person different in this regard, the same person can have different recovery times depending on their health a the moment, amount of sleep, diet, etc., so there is no good rule of thumb. (Other than 1-5 days, and once in a while a break of 21+ days, which as you rightly say should be discussed in other threads.)

Originally Posted by status135
Basically what I’m saying is that linear progression of intensity should be a part of every training routine.

Your training program shouldn’t say “200 jelqs” or “20 minutes of jelqing”. Instead it should be “Jelq - How many I did last session +20” or “Jelq- How long i jelqed for last session + 2 minutes”

So for example, if last session you did 250 jelqs then go for 270 this time and so on.

When this type of progressive system fails that is when a change in exercise should be considered. But in my oppinion sticking to the same intensity (for example : 200 jelqs per day) is only asking for gains to quickly come to a halt.

I agree. But the difference I would recommend is to actually wait until gains come to a halt, and even then to increase the intensity for 1-3 workouts to see if that will jump start the gains again.

I think you make an excellent point, and I know you are not recommending a scenario that when followed will result in PE over training.

I think the topic is very worthy of discussion.

This is only my opinion coming from my experience and what I have read here on the forum.


Sept. 4, '07: BPEL 6.875 inches, EG widest 5.25

Goal: Double digits

Here is a post from today that I think demonstrates the point I am trying to make:

Originally Posted by Pringles Can
Evergrowing - I started PE to get a more healthy penis, the size part - if I gained any - was to be a bonus. I started with only 40 jelqs a day and progressively worked up to 100 a day at the six month mark. I still after 13 months, only do 100 jelqs a day and some light stretching. I have worked on bettering my technique since I reached 100 and continue to slowly gain. I started a 2 on 1 off routine. After I started to plateau (around the 8 month mark) - I switched to 2 days on and 2 days off and my PI’s increased dramatically and I began to gain again. So far I have gained 1.13” in length and a frog-hair over 1/2” in girth. My point is why not start slow and see if it works for you. So many people that race through the newbie stage and move on to more advanced exercises are passing up the easiest gains you can get from PE. “Less is more” works, it is safer, and maximizes gains. Good Luck!!

He did change his routine, but did not increase the intensity. Probably won’t work for everyone, but it may be worth a try for everyone.


Sept. 4, '07: BPEL 6.875 inches, EG widest 5.25

Goal: Double digits

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