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The Problem with IPR (for me at least)

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The great thing about having made progress with a particular approach, is you can repeat it, modify it slightly and see if you are making progress again.

Once you have seen progress, its easier to identify if you are on track and gaining again. Make sure you do frequent measurements to determine if you are gaining or not. If not, then try and up the time for a couple weeks. If after trying this for a month, and still no gains, I would move on.

Just remember its far more productive to start with low force approaches, then progress up to higher force approaches. For example, lets just say you had great success hanging at 25 lbs, so you give it another go. Lets just say you make some good gains for a couple months and it stops. If you at that point if you go to pumping at 3 in hg….you can forget it! The tissues have toughened to the high forces, and stopped gaining. Going immediately to a low force approach without an extensive decon break is a waste of time.

On the other hand, if you have 3-4 different methods, and you begin to go through them starting with the lowest force and progress through them to the highest force…there is a good chance you can have a prolonged period of growth. Of course, at the end of this, lets say you ARE hanging at 20-25 lbs, and gains quit, it will probably take a 3 month decon break to begin gaining again with anything.

I wrote a thread on this called “force thresholds” linked at the bottom of my signature.

Originally Posted by Iguana
Thanks guys!!! That’s a very good idea! I have read several articles that talk about collagen fibers orienting themselves in the direction of the stress. So it would make sense to alter the stress angles and forces.

Thats why I like Wantsmore new way of stretching. I think it is a great way to specifically target fibers with a specificity and variation of angles that are very difficult to do with anything else. This would be a great variation to those that had quit gaining with standard hanging or stretching.

Of course, I think the way most guys will pull on their dicks will put this into a “high force” category, and I think 2 weeks is the most progress most guys will get before progress dramatically slow, ala IPR approach. If that is the case, then going straight into decon is a good idea.

This however, is probably not written in stone, so when doing this (or any method) you should have frequent bpfl measurement and not guess when gains stop…KNOW when they stop and go to decon. I think Xeno is dead on right in stating that the sooner you stop gaining and go to decon, the less decon is needed.

Nothing toughens a dick quicker than using higher and higher forces to get more gains from tissue that has already become too tough to make any significant progress.

So, back to thread’s topic, could IPR theory, at the state, be considered useful?

I see that, basically, everybody agree only on one point: if your gains stopped some time ago and nothing is working, you should try some week/month of rest. What about the rest of IPR theory? And what about this theory and hardgainers?

Bottom line ( in my mind) is if you can’t get gains in the I phase, then continuing is a waste of time. Its all a matter of dialing in your PE to get some gains to begin with.

That said, in my mind IPR is just another way of maximizing gains to effort ratio.

I think you could distill the best of IPR by saying, “PE until your gains dramatically slow or stop, then take a decon break, the length of the break depends directly on the forces used. The higher the forces, the longer the break that will be needed. The longer you continue to PE after gains stop, you dramatically increase the time needed for an effective decon break.” I really question the validity of the rest of the theory.

If no gains are seen initially, then what is the point of the rest of it?

Originally Posted by sparkyx
Bottom line ( in my mind) is if you can’t get gains in the I phase, then continuing is a waste of time. Its all a matter of dialing in your PE to get some gains to begin with.

That said, in my mind IPR is just another way of maximizing gains to effort ratio.

I think you could distill the best of IPR by saying, “PE until your gains dramatically slow or stop, then take a decon break, the length of the break depends directly on the forces used. The higher the forces, the longer the break that will be needed. The longer you continue to PE after gains stop, you dramatically increase the time needed for an effective decon break.” I really question the validity of the rest of the theory.

If no gains are seen initially, then what is the point of the rest of it?

I totally agree with you.

Hey Rush,

This might help a bit. I am in the physical therapy side of things and sometimes rather than like you said hanging 100lbs off your dick and hoping to make gains quick perhaps much lighter approach and try to keep the beef jerky thing away.

It sounds like you have tried a lot so if you have given it this approach then so be it, but when we have to stretch an injured muscle there are two approaches, one is to keep with the program and push, push, push (the ol’ no pain no gain thought process) but a newer approach to “problem” patients is to go incredibly slow so that they don’t get the resistance wall.

Just my two cents.


Sometime in 2005: Bpel 5.7, eg 4.3: 7/15/07 bpel=6.1, eg 4.6

Now bpel 6.50, eg 5.30 bpfsl 6.50

Goal bpel 7.0 - 7.5, eg 5.5

I appreciate that kdoc, thanks. Now I need to figure what incredibly slow would quantitatively mean for me, both in terms of time and weight. Off to the lab.

rushmore:

In case you’re curious, one way to determine how much force “incredibly slow” means is to plot your dick’s stress-strain curve. I would suggest that “incredibly slow” corresponds to forces that are less than the force at which the stress-strain curve slope increases dramatically — about 1 pound as seen in:

Innova - Penile stress/strain relationship

I say this merely because after that point, to increase the strain (which is dL/L), you must dramatically increase the applied force. But I have little reason beyond that.

What we tell the patients is if you feel it, it is too much. Over time the point where they feel it progesses and whalla. Unfortunately it does take more time and the biggest hurdle is to make sure you are not letting your mind tell you when you feel it but listening to your body.

Hopefully this helps.


Sometime in 2005: Bpel 5.7, eg 4.3: 7/15/07 bpel=6.1, eg 4.6

Now bpel 6.50, eg 5.30 bpfsl 6.50

Goal bpel 7.0 - 7.5, eg 5.5

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