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Micro Tears Vs Scar Tissue

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Micro Tears Vs Scar Tissue

Hey all. Hope your PE in going well..

Can someone clue me in on the difference between the micro tears in my penis I’m hoping to get and what scar tissue that I don’t want looks like. Under the right light on PE days I mite see a small red line that looks like a tear under my skin on my dick (are these the micro tears) and I do feel that awesome itchiness but I don’t want to get any scar tissue because from what I’ve read it’s going the have the adverse effect on gains. I warm up/down/up/down religiously.
Also, what’s the best way to avoid scar tissue but still achieve the micro tears if they do indeed lead to gains!!
Let me know I’m committed as hell, really do a lot of in depth reading and I’m only a week into PE, taking it easy, but I’ve already had a lig pop and will post pics to silence the non believers as my PE career continues

Those red lines are most likely capillaries IMHO.

To avoid scar tissue you should avoid intense forces, expecially when your penis is erect: the most dangerous thing is bending the erect penis.
In most of people it’s unlikely that scar tissue will form in the penis, basing on the little we know both from anecdotical and research knowledge. There are people who are predisposed to Peyronie’ disease, those guys will develop scar tissue not only by PE but from vigorous sexual activity and even from playing sport (sometimes there isn’t even a trauma conductive to the formation of scar tissue in the penis).

Peyrone disease is something you have to be predisposed with. Otherwise you won’t get it. I have friends that also bended their penis during sex and except for couple of days of pain, nothing happened.

I don’t think PE is something that can develop you scar tissue, especially for jelq, even high erected ones.


Starting November 2013 - BP 18.0 MSEG 14.0

March 2014 - BP 18.3 MSEG 14.5

Foto di Jugg

You have to realize not everything you read is fact, and your questions only surround pure fiction so any answers will be moot. Just tug and squeeze and let the rest work itself out.


Troll. Please take any posts by this member as potentially misleading and harmful.

Collagen structures are actually incredibly strong. Let’s look at some rough figures as an illustration.

A study(1) assessed the strength of the tunica and came up with a lowest measured value of 16MPa required to break it by a normal force. The tip of my pointer finger is approximately 1cm x 1.5cm. In order for me to rupture the tunica they tested on by pushing a single finger into it, I’d need to push with a force equivalent to gravity acting on ~240kg (528lbs). So what about constriction? With a 2cm wide constriction device (your fingers, for instance) I’d need to apply 4480 kilogram-force (9856 pound-force). This is about 1% of the grip strength found in (2).

In regards to all the tugging we do, using a rough estimate of the tunica thickness from (1) of 1mm (stretched, I’m assuming), with my girth being 14cm, I would need to pull with ~224 kg-force (493 lbs-force) to rupture the tunica, assuming a uniform radial distribution of the force and using the same 16MPa figure (the order of magnitude should at least be correct). Again, few people exceed 1% of this during PE.

The order of magnitude of the figures in these studies seems consistent with many others I’ve read, so while I’m not trying to give exact figures I can confidently say that the above calculations should adequately illustrate that you’re unlikely to get anywhere near the force necessary for breakage through basic PE exercises. Erect bending is another matter, as Marinera pointed out above.
But surely it’s possible to cause damage without complete breakage? Yes, it is. But you actually need to get fairly close to the breaking point before it happens. Rupture of fibers in tendons usually doesn’t occur significantly until a 5-6% strain (lengthening) is reached and once this happen, total failure will usually also occur with no further increase in stress. Even microtrauma is reserved for the top ~50% of the breaking stress. Again, I’m not saying that it’s impossible to cause damage to the tissue before your dick snaps in two, but it’s not something you need to worry about unless you’re doing very, very extreme forms of PE. Other tissues in your penis will probably get damaged long before your tunica.

You’re usually tempted to underestimate the strength of these structures because they’re so often damaged in tendons during physical activity, but these are placed in poor mechanical positions and subject to quite incredible forces. The tunica of the penis is in a very favorable position, mechanically speaking.

(1)http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8158761
(2)http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3101655/
(note: these are just random studies I pulled off google and skimmed for results. I can’t necessarily vouch for the content.)

Serenity,

I’m not disagreeing with your figures, I think they’re spot on.
Given that I’m interested to know your opinion on how gains are possible at all ?

If you are healthy(espacially no metabolic disorders) then it is hard to develope scar tissue as long as you stay within reasonable force.

You always want to hit the least force necessary to gain the most.

Rest days ensure that the damage you inflicted is healing properly. You dont want to be inflammed for too long.
But it can also be that a good night of sleep is enough.
Also attacking from another angle or a different force/time can help.
The more´healthy blood circulates through your dick the better.

Originally Posted by capernicus1
Serenity,

I’m not disagreeing with your figures, I think they’re spot on.
Given that I’m interested to know your opinion on how gains are possible at all ?

Frustratingly, I really don’t know. But I’m pretty sure it’s not mechanical. There was a lot of talk about plastic deformation a year or two ago and I think that’s a very unlikely cause.

As far as newbie gains go, a combination of higher elastin concentration, better EQ, and a reorganization (alignment and uncrimping) of the collagen fibers could be a reasonable explanation. But beyond that, honestly, I’m stumped. There are so many factors involved, I can’t seem to put together a picture where everything makes sense.

Plastic deformation is just a description of something deforming beyond the point where it can rebound elastically. It describes what happens but not how.


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Originally Posted by memento
Plastic deformation is just a description of something deforming beyond the point where it can rebound elastically. It describes what happens but not how.

But it’s still an immediate response to mechanical loading. My point is that the force necessary to strain collagen to its plastic region is not achieved with PE exercises.
Likewise for creep. There’s usually a threshold stress level you need to cross before it sets in. I’ve been unable to find any specific number on this for collagen, but given that the stress we apply is probably near 1-2% of the yield stress, it’s not very probable that creep occurs. And if we are in fact above the threshold, the stress is so low that the time necessary for it to be significant is absurdly high (years).
Factor in heat and the time it takes creep to set in drops by a lot, but you’re still not likely to get anywhere near the 8 hours that people spend in an extender, let alone 20 minutes of hanging.

Mechanical loading obviously seems to be required in order to lengthen the penis, but I think the actual process is entirely biological.

Of course biological. It just makes sense that the amount of stress needed to activate a defensive biological response is lower than the amount needed to cause significative physical deformation. Any living tissue is organized, and a small change in an organized set of things makes more shit than a change in a not organized set of things.

Originally Posted by marinera
Of course biological. It just makes sense that the amount of stress needed to activate a defensive biological response is lower than the amount needed to cause significative physical deformation. Any living tissue is organized, and a small change in an organized set of things makes more shit than a change in a not organized set of things.

It absolutely does make sense :) . But the PE community as a whole is full of contrary theories - that’s why I mentioned the plastic thing in particular.

At the same time it raises a bunch of questions, though! If it’s all a growth response, why haven’t our chem-pe pioneers found a “sure thing” yet? Does the mechanical stress affect receptors in the tissue? What’s the importance of inflammation? - if it was only a catalyst for the biological response, chem-pe again should be more effective.


Last edited by Serenity73 : 05-04-2014 at .

Mechanical stress triggers a number of adaptive reponse. One surprising finding about tendon-like structures in vivo is that even the slightest stretching force cause cell proliferation and that inflammation and scar tissue are seen only after a grade A damage, which means complete disruption of the given tissue; if the damage is not complete there is little or not inflammation and and scar tissue formation is absent.

Those who are on chem-PE are actually, in most of the cases, basing their attempts on the wrong ideas about connective tissue and how it reacts to stress. To be honest theirs attempts look pretty much trials at random.

Tunica albuginea, which is the limiting factor, is very, very thin - about 0.2 mm, going to memory. It isn’t really possible to inject anything into it without some very sophisticated devices, it is unlikely that anything tried since now could change in its stricture, it’s scarcely flowed with blood and it’s unlikely that any substance that could work in theory will reach in a singificative amount the tunica albuginea, no matter how you put said substance inside the body.

But there are other questions that are more misterious; the biggest one I have in mind, is : how come that pumping is so ineffective for most of people, when compared to other PE techniques? It provides mechanical stress in the best way, from a theoritical point of view, and fatigue of other body parts is not an issue; it is even funny, so why?


Last edited by marinera : 05-04-2014 at .

Originally Posted by Serenity73
Why haven’t our chem-PE pioneers found a “sure thing” yet? Does the mechanical stress affect receptors in the tissue?

I’m wondering how many people that do chemPE are actually doing intense exercises (intense being manual+).
The few I have seen openly keeping logs and/or giving feedback results, are only doing basic manuals.
There are some that have done intense exercises + basic chemPE, but those logs died off or are not updated often.

I think the chems are out there, but @ the same time I don’t think you can do w/o actually doing PE.

But again, if they do exercises, how do you know it’s the chem working? You should have huge evidence of unusual gains to conclude that chems are doing something. Add the placebo effect to the mix and there isn’t hope anymore to understand what is doing what. The sole way to know chems are working would be no exercise at all and still gains.

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