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DIY Shockwave Therapy Machine

Originally Posted by Golddinger
The Ultrasound Device.

What kind of a budget would satisfy your DIY needs?

Originally Posted by PhoenixNow
Goldinger,

Is there a setting on the shockwave machine you’d like me to check.

The lady doing it is nice and would likely indulge my curiosity.

I can’t really think of any other parameters we’d need. The circuit design seems like it’d be fairly rudimentary, based on my extremely limited experience with circuits, but still probably a little beyond me. An arrangement of a few square waves controlling an ultrasonic piezo-transducer.
One could probably be thrown together for less than $100, and an even more rudimentary one, without as much control over the “pulse frequency” could probably be done for less than $50.
The right piezo is for sale on the internet for about $20. After that you’d need a few $0.50-$2.00 resistors, capacitors, an integrated circuit (look up how an “oscillator circuit” is built and you’ll see they’re extremely simple), some solder, some wire, and something to house the piezo, which could be just about anything.

That being said, I’m gonna wait and see how the therapy works a little bit before I invest any more time into this. If anyone else wants to try their hand at building one, it would not be hard.

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The Ultrasound device I found is $150.

I’m still testing the device (15 minute session) and pumping afterward (30+ minutes).

I’ll give you my opinion in a month or so.

Originally Posted by Kamel407
The Ultrasound device I found is $150.

I’m still testing the device (15 minute session) and pumping afterward (30+ minutes).

I’ll give you my opinion in a month or so.

Awesome, thanks!

Originally Posted by Golddinger
Awesome, thanks!

What are some expectations you’re looking for as far as results per session?

It will help me to monitor and give feedback.

I have no idea, frankly. I’m more interested in any noticeable long-term results, in whatever form they take.

Originally Posted by Golddinger
To be honest I’m having a bit of trouble understanding how atmospheric pressure is involved in ultrasonic waves, but I imagine it’s a function of the waveform itself in some way(?). At any rate we’re not remotely talking about inserting the penis into any kind of device which would be creating atmospheric pressure of any kind. These devices send a momentary acoustic shockwave through the penis, essentially just a short, very specific very high-frequency vibration, to trigger a physiological tissue growth response. Imagine a suped-up smart vibrator against your penis and you’re not far off.
At any rate, these therapies are extremely extremely safe, done in outpatient clinics everywhere. I’m more worried that they’re a waste of time stupid fad than I am of the risk involved.

The fact that you are having trouble understanding how pressure is involved with ultrasonic waves is kind of the problem. You are literally talking about playing with forces you don’t understand. Sorry, I don’t know a nicer way to say that.

There’s a difference between a DIY shockwave device and an ultrasound system that has been approved by the FDA. And just because your dick isn’t inside the stick of dynamite doesn’t mean it won’t get blown off if you set it off just pressed up next to it.

So, please be careful. Or, better yet, just don’t do this.

To be clear, I mean don’t try to build your own shockwave device and use it on your dick without serious safety testing. If you have access to a medical grade ultrasound therapy device, well that’s different. In that case proceed with caution if you choose to do so and I wish you all the best.

Originally Posted by FunSize
The fact that you are having trouble understanding how pressure is involved with ultrasonic waves is kind of the problem. You are literally talking about playing with forces you don’t understand. Sorry, I don’t know a nicer way to say that.

There’s a difference between a DIY shockwave device and an ultrasound system that has been approved by the FDA. And just because your dick isn’t inside the stick of dynamite doesn’t mean it won’t get blown off if you set it off just pressed up next to it.

Ok. How about an explanation. This thread is investigative, meant to field questions and receive pertinent pointed input. If you know how pressure is involved with ultrasonic waves, and how a piezo, the device used in greeting cards to play holiday chiptunes, is able to make any tissue explode like a stick of dynamite, kindly explain.

Are you referring to compression of tissue? My understanding of acoustic waves is that wavelength is modulated by atmospheric pressure, and I can see how this might translate to tissue.

Unless you’ve got some reasoning or argument based on a clearly communicable understanding of the dangers involved, which I’m all ears to hear, I’m not convinced. These machines are not laser guns they’re not dynamite, by all accounts the risk factor is extremely low. They’re creating acoustic vibrations, at a set frequency, rate, and amplitude. That’s it. If you have relevant experience or understanding, tell me what I’m missing.


Last edited by Golddinger : 02-22-2019 at .

as an FYI I’m doing 15 minutes with my device and then 15 minutes jelqing and my unit has expansion much like pumping for an extended period but without the donut effect after.

The device definitely warms up my unit and turns it a nice deep red, I’ve been adding in the perenium as well. After jelqing the color is even more pronounced.

I’ve noticed with an erection, the stimulation from the heat and movement of the device gets me extremely horny and I can only jelq for so long before I want to climax.

Just fyi shockwave and ultrasound are very different technologies. It’s being used synonymously here and can be confusing

Originally Posted by Golddinger
Ok. How about an explanation. This thread is investigative, meant to field questions and receive pertinent pointed input. If you know how pressure is involved with ultrasonic waves, and how a piezo, the device used in greeting cards to play holiday chiptunes, is able to make any tissue explode like a stick of dynamite, kindly explain.

Are you referring to compression of tissue? My understanding of acoustic waves is that wavelength is modulated by atmospheric pressure, and I can see how this might translate to tissue.

Unless you’ve got some reasoning or argument based on a clearly communicable understanding of the dangers involved, which I’m all ears to hear, I’m not convinced. These machines are not laser guns they’re not dynamite, by all accounts the risk factor is extremely low. They’re creating acoustic vibrations, at a set frequency, rate, and amplitude. That’s it. If you have relevant experience or understanding, tell me what I’m missing.

I’m not an expert in ultrasound. Nor am I a doctor. But I am an engineer with a background in fluid dynamics, mechanics, structures, transducers, etc. I was the guy who threw the curve in the Honors Physics classes at my University. I have a solid understanding of both sound waves and piezoelectric transducers.

When I talked about 100 MPa (Mega Pascal) earlier I was trying to make the point that this is a very high pressure level. It is roughly the same as 14,500 psi (pounds per square inch). Pressure waves at this level can cause permanent tissue damage. Of course it all depends on the details, what is the beam shape, what is the pulse duration, frequency, power density, etc.

From the literature that I have read, most therapeutic ultrasound procedures use low power densities and peak pressures usually range from 0.1 to 0.7 MPa. 100 MPa is, as far as I know, only used for things like blasting kidney stones. And when they do that they use special machines which focus the waves so that the maximum pressure is only applied at the stone, and the rest of the surrounding tissues experience much lower pressures. Even then the surrounding tissues can be severely damaged. Look up “Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy” and its side effects.

I could go on; I’m tempted to refute several of your statements, point by point. But I’m done. If you want to know more you’re going to have to get it from someone else. Google is your friend. Try “Health Effects of Exposure to Ultrasound and Infrasound” and “Output Measurements for Medical Ultrasound” for starters.

For the rest of you, please be safe.

DIY pneumatic shock wave device

A DIY pneumatic shock wave device for less than $100 dollars.

Parts list:
1. Air compressor with an outlet pressure regulator, cost $50 dollars
2. Air hammer / chisel, cost $40, must have old type end with spring holder not the drill type chuck.
3. A metal cap to close off the end of the air chisel barrel.
4. Metal bolt that can be the ballistic bullet, I am using a carriage bolt, experiment with needed length.
5. Plumbers tape.
6. Binding post 3/16 inch x 1/2 inch #284 706.
7. Various washers as standoff to raise binding post from metal cap.

Assembly instructions:
Drill a hole in the center of the metal cap and put the binding post in the hole.
Use washers outside of metal cap for standoff and tighten binding post.
The screw driver slot of binding post goes inside of metal cap, smooth side outside of metal cap.
This part is important because it will be the piece touching your dick.
Place large washer as strike plate between binding post and ballistic bullet, this protects the screw driver slot of the binding post.
Remove spring holder from air hammer / chisel.
Place ballistic bullet into barrel of air hammer / chisel.
Wrap plumbers tape around air hammer / chisel threads.
Screw metal cap onto air hammer / chisel end creating pneumatic gun.

After I built this I tried it on my thigh with the regulator pressure at 15psi and it worked. I am still in the experiment stage, I think I may need to drill some tiny holes in the metal cap for proper operation and not have the cap blow off. May need jbweld on hammer / chisel threads too.
My diy device made the rat a tat sound you will hear if you watch any of the online videos, and I could feel the stinging vibrations. What I need is a way to calibrate the air compressor PSI to BARS of pressure so I don’t beat my dick to death. This is where things get real tricky with science. If the PSI is to low you are wasting your time, to high and say goodbye to your dick. You want to stay between 1 and 5 BARS. Maybe this can go viral as an instruct-able and someone figure out how to calibrate it.

Last but not least you will need numbing cream and use a lot of it all over your crotch. A pair of rubber gloves might help as well.

DIY Electromagnetic shockwave device

A DIY electromagnetic shock wave device, cost unknown.

Parts list:
1. High voltage charging system
2. Triggered spark gap (http://www.excelitas.com/downloads/…ransformers.pdf).
3. DC power supply.
4. Timing control circuit using 555 integrated circuit.
5. Flashlight with exterior rubber coating to prevent shock hazard.
6. Metal post / nail.
7. 22 gauge magnetic wire.
8. Cylindrical insulator covering metal post / nail.
9. Cylindrical insulator covering magnetic wire after constructing electromagnet.
10. Cylindrical piece of metal for the diaphragm.

Assembly instructions:
Place insulator over nail.
Wrap magnetic wire around nail creating electromagnet, keep it neat and tight only one layer.
Place insulator over electromagnet coil winding.
Place metal diaphragm over insulator.
Remove light bulb from flashlight and install electromagnet device in it’s place.
Everything must be electrically insulated to prevent shock hazard.

Pictures provided for applicator head and timing control circuit.

This is where things get real tricky with science. The focal point of your DIY device needs to be determined for greatest effect. The high voltage level will determine the BARS of pressure. You want to stay between 1 and 5 BARS. Maybe this can go viral as an instruct-able and someone figure out how to calibrate it.

Last but not least you will need numbing cream and use a lot of it all over your crotch. A pair of rubber gloves might help as well.

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Originally Posted by FunSize

From the literature that I have read, most therapeutic ultrasound procedures use low power densities and peak pressures usually range from 0.1 to 0.7 MPa. 100 MPa is, as far as I know, only used for things like blasting kidney stones. And when they do that they use special machines which focus the waves so that the maximum pressure is only applied at the stone, and the rest of the surrounding tissues experience much lower pressures. Even then the surrounding tissues can be severely damaged. Look up “Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy” and its side effects.

I could go on; I’m tempted to refute several of your statements, point by point. But I’m done. If you want to know more you’re going to have to get it from someone else. Google is your friend. Try “Health Effects of Exposure to Ultrasound and Infrasound” and “Output Measurements for Medical Ultrasound” for starters.

I unequivocally appreciate this input.
Pardon me for any causticism in my previous reply. I’m not speaking here from a macho defensive need to stand by my first thought, I value pointed and clear criticism in the interest of constructing as clear and concise an understanding as possible. Previous posters, insinuating their expertise, were assuming a dismissive tone while trying to tell me that the ultrasonic range was within kHz rather than mHz, so I hope you’ll see why I was frustrated with nonspecific scary sounding criticisms.

I’m leaning away from feeling like this is a worthwhile investment of my time anyway, but just for curiosity’s sake, is a simple low-power ultrasonic transducer really capable of producing 100MPa of pressure? And am I right in reading that as a compressive pressure exerted on the tissue? The ultrasonic therapy machines that I’ve seen don’t appear to be so operationally similar to the kidney stone blaster that you refer to, or even very complex. They seem to consist of a box controlling output voltage and a small ultrasonic piezo in a plastic wand-housing. There’s no means to isolate target tissue like a kidney stone would conceivably require. A box and a wand, sold for home use by laymans.
My suspicion is that we’re talking about different devices but yes I’m absolutely a layman here.
What I would like to know is exactly what variable differentiates the .01-.07 MPa device from the 100MPa one. Is this pressure difference a result of higher amplitude? In which case can’t this very easily be kept safe by limiting the circuit to outputting within a set range of voltage/amperage?

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