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The big penis and mens' sexual health source, increasing penis size around the world.

Recommend an excellent and priced fair multi vitamin

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MegaMen From GNC is a good one.(~ $15 per 90 tabs)

Ultimate Man from Vitamin Shoppe is another good one.. (~$15 per 90 tabs)

Animal Pak by Universal Nutrition.way too many pills, perhaps excessive contents.(~$25-30 per month supply)


2/11/11: 7.75" BPEL, 6" BSEG, 5.5" MSEG

6/4/11: 8.4" BPEL, 6.375" BSEG, 5.8" MSEG

Just started again, another new measurement coming soon; I'm pretty close to that June '11 though.

Multivitamins are the most commonly used diet supplement, but new research shows that daily multivitamin use doesn’t ward off cancer or heart disease.

In a study of 161,808 women who were part of the government-funded Women’s Health Initiative research effort, doctors from 40 centers around the country collected data on multivitamin use. While research shows that people who eat nutrient-rich diets filled with fruits and vegetables have lower rates of heart disease and cancer, it hasn’t been clear whether taking a daily supplement results in a similar benefit.

After following the women for about eight years, they looked at rates of various cancers and heart problems among the 42 percent of women who were regular multivitamin users, and compared them to those who didn’t take vitamins. The researchers found no evidence of any benefit from multivitamin use in any of 10 categories studied, including no differences in the rate of breast or colon cancer, heart attack, stroke, blood clots or mortality. The findings were published in the current issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The finding that multivitamins produced no benefit in such a large, well-regarded study is disappointing, given that some earlier research has produced mixed results. While some earlier studies failed to show a benefit of daily multivitamin use, other research has suggested a possible benefit for colon and breast cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, those data were collected from less rigorous studies, and researchers say the lack of a benefit measured in the Women’s Health Initiative is a “robust finding.” In the tightly controlled W.H.I. trials, data from women were copiously collected, and participants actually brought vitamin bottles to W.H.I. centers so supplement use could be confirmed by researchers.

“We have very detailed information on what people were taking measured over a period of many years,” said Marian Neuhouser, the lead author and associate member in cancer prevention at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. “We thought there could be a modestly reduced risk, but there is nothing. There is no helpful benefit, but they’re not hurting either.”

About half of all Americans use some form of vitamin or dietary supplement, spending $20 billion annually on the products. In a statement, the vitamin industry trade group, the Council for Responsible Nutrition, said the study shouldn’t dissuade consumers from using multivitamins, since many of them aren’t getting essential nutrients in their diets.

“From a practical standpoint, this study does not change the fact that the majority of consumers could benefit from taking an affordable multivitamin,” said Andrew Shao, vice president of scientific and regulatory affairs with the council. “It is better to meet these recommendations than not, and consistently taking a multivitamin over the long term could help fill these nutrient gaps and may help consumers lead healthier lives.”

Dr. Neuhouser said she realizes that many people who are devoted vitamin users will be skeptical of the finding that they are receiving no benefit from a daily multivitamin.

“I don’t want to disparage people who take multivitamins — it’s their choice as a consumer,” Dr. Neuhouser said. “What we’re presenting is the science showing it’s neither beneficial nor harmful. If they want to choose to spend their dollars elsewhere this might be a good place to do so. Perhaps they can buy more fruits and vegetables.”

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/…y-multivitamin/


Starting Stats - Feb 2010 - 5.5 NBPEL x 5.6 EG

Current Stats - Oct 2014 - 6.2 NBPEL x 6.1 EG

Goal - 7 x 6 (with hopefully a large flaccid hang)

I was wondering when someone was going to post a study against multivitamins. So do I Google for positive studies on multivitamins and post one to contradict? What’s the point?

The OP is already predisposed to taking multi’s. At $10 for a years supply of multivitamins I’ll continue to take them.

Originally Posted by Cock Kent
I was wondering when someone was going to post a study against multivitamins. So do I Google for positive studies on multivitamins and post one to contradict? What’s the point?

The OP is already predisposed to taking multi’s. At $10 for a years supply of multivitamins I’ll continue to take them.

If you can find one done on a similar number of participants with good methodology, be my guest. The study said no benefit, but no damage, so if it makes you feel better to take a pill daily then $10 annually is no significant loss. I would like to point out though that the above is just one of many well run, large scale studies that show no benefit from multivitamins.

I thought they cost a lot more than that though?


Starting Stats - Feb 2010 - 5.5 NBPEL x 5.6 EG

Current Stats - Oct 2014 - 6.2 NBPEL x 6.1 EG

Goal - 7 x 6 (with hopefully a large flaccid hang)


Last edited by boner7484 : 04-07-2011 at .

I’ve always considered multivitamins as expensive urine unless you’re on a really poor diet.

I mean seriously, which genius thought it would be a good idea to put Calcium and Zinc in the same pill? :shrug:


I'm a big fan of 50 Cent, or as we call him in Zimbabwe, four hundred million dollars.

Originally Posted by boner7484

If you can find one done on a similar number of participants with good methodology, be my guest.

Nope cause that’s how pissing contests get started. Anyway, I have to go post in the “Big Tit Lovers” thread that anything more than a mouthful is waste.

I go with Solgar’s VM 2000. They’re pretty good.

Originally Posted by Tossed Salad

I mean seriously, which genius thought it would be a good idea to put Calcium and Zinc in the same pill? :shrug:

Usually a multi contains 10-15% RDA of calcium(100-150mg) and >=100% zinc(15 mg zinc). Sure, a high calcium intake could offset the absorption of the zinc as per this study http://www.ajcn.org/content/65/6/1803.abstract.

“… used to investigate the acute effect of a 15-mmol CaCO3 (600 mg Ca) supplement, with and without extra zinc, on zinc absorption from a single test meal supplying 111.7 mumol (7.3 mg) Zn. Zinc absorption was reduced significantly by 50% when the calcium supplement was given with the meal. Inclusion of an extra 119.3 mumol (7.8 mg) Zn as part of a calcium supplement offset the detrimental effect of calcium on zinc absorption”

Ok, here they gave 600 mg of Ca(3-4 times more than the amount, as I said, usually contained in a multi-at least the multi that I take) and 7.8 mg zinc(half of what is contained usually). It reduced zinc absorption by 50%(3.9 mg zinc lost). They also said that “Inclusion of an extra 119.3 mumol (7.8 mg) Zn as part of a calcium supplement offset the detrimental effect of calcium on zinc absorption”. So 7.8 +7.8=15.6 offsets the detrimental effects of 600 mg Ca on zinc’s absorption.

Now getting back to a multi which contains about 100-150 mg of Ca and 15 mg of zinc, what do you think the result will be ?


Starting stats: 6.4" / 5.6" Current Stats: 7.4" / 5.8" Short term goal: 7" / 6" Long term goal: 8" / 6.5"

http://blog.bodybuilding.com/dinoii…min-mvi-debate/

^This Doc knows his stuff! The bioavailability of the components of multi vitamins is almost always bad. The fact that most of them have a load of calcium included shows you that the companies don’t care about how well it works, rather just that you buy into the idea that it does.

As an athlete, I go with his recommendations. ACES supplement (vitamins A, C, E and Selenium) and a B-complex vitamin (I use Jarrow Forumlas B-right, a few caps spread throughout the day) and a chelated mineral supplement.

It’s important to note that vitamin C should never be taken in single doses above 500mg. Taking more than 500mg at any one time will actually cause pro-oxidant effects in the body. I take 500mg 3 times daily (away from any dietary fat).


Decemeber 2007: 5.8" BPEL x 4.9" MSEG

Current:-------->7.7" BPEL x 5.7" MSEG (7.2" NBPEL)

Current Goal:--->7.6" BPEL X 5.8" MSEG Do or do not, there is no "try".

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